Ex-post evaluation of the European Union occupatinal safety and health Directives

Occupational safety and health (OSH) forms an integral part of the European labour market. It is an important element of the European social protection structure. In the context of European integration and realisation of the internal market, a common framework was established through Directive 89/391/EEC (Framework Directive) aiming at securing a minimum level of protection from work-related health and safety risks for the workers of all Member States. This framework built on the existing systems at the time and laid down important common principles of prevention, risk assessment, information, training etc. It established minimum protection levels while allowing Member States to go further if so desired. Building on these common principles, 23 further Directives have been adopted dealing with specific risks and situations. Together this set of rules constitutes the OSH framework.
The Commission is required to regularly evaluate the implementation of the OSH framework. This evaluation report draws from a number of elements, including an independent study, National Implementation Reports (NIRs) from all Member States and numerous consultation mechanisms involving independent experts, inspectors and representatives from industry, workers and Member States. The value of occupational safety and health interventions has to be considered in the light of which interventions at which level are most useful. This exercise also forms part of the Commission's Regulatory Fitness (REFIT) Programme with a special focus on SMEs. The REFIT Programme focuses on efficiency, effectiveness and legislative simplification including avoiding unnecessary regulatory burden.

Source: http://www.etui.org/fr/content/download/25879/245190/file/Commission+europ%C3%A9enne+-+Ex-post+evaluation+of+the+European+Union+occupatinal+safety+and+health+Directives+%2810+janvier+2017%29.pdf

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