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Work-related biomechanical exposure and job strain in midlife separately and jointly predict disability after 28 years
A Finnish longitudinal study Higher level of work-related biomechanical exposure and job strain in midlife separately and jointly carried a higher risk for increase in disability after 28 years. Mitigation of both of these co-occurring exposures at work in midlife could reduce the risk of disability in later life. Thus the workplace should be promoted as an arena for preventive interventions regarding disability in old age. Source: Prakash KC, Neupane S, Leino-Arjas P, von Bonsdorff MB, Rantanen T, von Bonsdorff ME, Seitsamo J, Ilmarinen J, Nygård C-H. (2017). Scand J Work Environ Health...
Older females in the workforce
The effects of age on psychophysical estimates of maximum acceptable lifting loads This psychophysical study demonstrated that older female workers (aged 50–63 years) selected maximum acceptable lift masses that were (on average) 24% lower than younger workers (aged 20–32 years), which corresponded with lower grip strength and heart rate reserve. Current maximum acceptable lifting weights based on psychophysical information may not protect female workers greater than 50 years of age. Source: Chen, J. A., Dickerson, C. R., Wells, R. P., & Laing, A. C. (2017). Ergonomics , 1-34. http...
Aging and MSD: Strategies for Older Workers
The global population is aging with a projection that one in five people will be over the age of 60 by 2050. The Canadian population aged 65 and over is expected to double over the next 25 years. The Canadian workforce is also aging with a large proportion of workers (42.4%) in the 45 to 64 age group in 2011 and the average age of labor market participant predicted to continue to rise until 20314. However, it appears that very few Canadian companies have addressed the impact of an aging workforce on occupational health. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a burden to all industrial sectors. They...
Influence of Manual Labor at Work on Muscular Fitness and Its Relationship With Work Performance
Objective: The present study examined the influence of workplace manual labor on measures of muscular fitness, with a secondary aim to investigate the relationship between muscular fitness and work performance in blue-collar (BC) workers. Methods: Leg extension isokinetic strength at slow and fast velocities, hamstring and hip-flexor flexibility, and low back muscular endurance were examined in young and older BC workers and white-collar (WC) controls, while work performance was examined in the BC cohort. Results: There were no differences in muscular fitness variables between BC and WC groups;...
Work productivity loss in young workers
This report estimates work productivity loss due to musculoskeletal pain in 23-year-old workers in Western Australia based on findings from the longitudinal Raine Study. The report ascertains the prevalence of diagnosed back and neck pain among young workers, provides estimates of work productivity loss among young workers and examines the impact of musculoskeletal pain specifically on work productivity. Productivity measures used in this report are absenteeism due to health reasons, absenteeism due to any other reason, and presenteeism. The report also assesses the prevalence of psychological...
Patterns of biomechanical demands are associated with musculoskeletal pain in the beginning of professional life
A population-based study Objectives: This study aimed to describe patterns of occupational biomechanical demands in the beginning of professional life and to quantify their association with the presence and intensity of regional musculoskeletal pain. Methods :Cross-sectional data from 21-year-old participants were collected during the third wave of the EPITeen cohort study (N=1733, 37.5% were workers). Ten different work-related biomechanical tasks were characterized. Latent class analysis was conducted to identify empirical patterns of occupational biomechanical demands. The presence and intensity...
Are elderly construction workers sufficiently fit for heavy manual labour?
This study analysed the work ability of elderly construction workers. Forty male construction workers, 20 young (age < 33 yrs) and 20 senior (age>44 yrs) workers, were tested regarding aerobic power (VO2max) and muscle strength. The aerobic demand of a number of tasks in construction work was measured and compared with the workers' aerobic power. VO2max was higher for the young, and they performed better on most muscle strength tests. The measurements showed that about half of the senior workers had to use more than 30% of their maximum oxygen uptake on some tasks. In conclusion, because...
A longitudinal study on risk factors for neck and shoulder pain among young adults in the transition from technical school to working life
Objectives: The study examined the course of neck and shoulder pain among a cohort of technical school students entering working life. We also aimed to identify work-related and individual risk factors for neck and shoulder pain during this transition period. Methods: The study was designed as a prospective cohort study following 420 technical school students (167 student hairdressers, 118 student electricians, and 135 media/design students) from school, through their apprenticeship and into working life. Every 4th month over a 6.5 year period (2002–2009), the participant`s neck and shoulder...
How much do preexisting chronic conditions contribute to age differences in health care expenditures after a work-related musculoskeletal injury?
OBJECTIVES: To estimate the contribution of preexisting chronic conditions on age differences in health care expenditures for the management of work-related musculoskeletal injuries in British Columbia. METHODS: A secondary analysis of workers' compensation claims submitted over the 5-year period between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2006 (N=55,827 claims among men and 32,141 claims among women). Path models examined the relationships between age and health care expenditures, and the extent to which age differences in health care expenditures were mediated by preexisting chronic conditions...
Impact of pre-existing chronic conditions on age differences in sickness absence after a musculoskeletal work injury
A path analysis approach Objectives: This study aims to examine the extent to which a greater prevalence of pre-existing chronic conditions among older workers explains why older age is associated with longer duration of sickness absence (SA) following a musculoskeletal work-related injury in British Columbia. Methods: A secondary analysis of workers' compensation claims in British Columbia over three time periods (1997–1998; 2001–2002, and 2005–2006), the study comprised 102 997 and 53 882 claims among men and women, respectively. Path models examined the relationships between...

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