2013-07-01 12:00 - Messages

A prospective study of musculoskeletal outcomes among manufacturing workers: II. Effects of psychosocial stress and work organization factors

Objective: The aim of this study was to characterize associations between psychosocial and work organizational risk factors and upper-extremity musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders. Background: Methodological limitations of previous studies of psychosocial and work organizational risk factors and musculoskeletal outcomes have produced inconsistent associations. Method: In this prospective epidemiologic study of 386 workers, questionnaires to assess decision latitude (“control”) and psychological job demands (“demand”) were administered to study participants and were used to classify them into job strain “quadrants.” Measures of job stress and job change were collected during each week of follow-up. Incident hand/arm and neck/shoulder symptoms and disorders were ascertained weekly. Associations between exposure measures and musculoskeletal outcomes were estimated with proportional hazard methods. Results: When compared to the low-demand/high-control job strain referent category, large increases in risk of hand/arm disorders were observed for both high-demand/high- control (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.23, 16.4]) and high-demand/low-control job strain categories (HR = 5.18, 95% CI = [1.39, 19.4]). Similar associations were observed for hand/arm symptoms. A strong association was also observed between the low-demand/low-control job strain category and neck/shoulder disorders (HR = 6.46, 95% CI = [1.46, 28.6]). Statistically significant associations were also observed between weekly stress level and weekly job change and several musculoskeletal outcomes. Conclusion: Associations between psychosocial risk factors and work organizational factors and musculoskeletal outcomes were large and in the hypothesized direction. Application: Prevention of occupational musculoskeletal disorders may require attention to psychosocial and work organizational factors in addition to physical factors. Methods to control adverse effects of psychosocial and work organizational risk factors should be explored.

Source : Gerr, F., Fethke, N. B., Anton, D., Merlino, L. A., Rosecrance, J. C., Marcus, M., & Jones, M. (2013). A prospective study of musculoskeletal outcomes among manufacturing workers: II. Effects of psychosocial stress and work organization factors. Human Factors. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720813487201

 

A prospective study of musculoskeletal outcomes among manufacturing workers: I. Effects of physical risk factors

Objective: To better characterize associations between physical risk factors and upper-extremity musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders, a prospective epidemiologic study of 386 manufacturing workers was performed. Background: Methodological limitations of previous studies have resulted in inconsistent associations. Method: An individual, task-based exposure assessment strategy was used to assess upper-extremity exertion intensity, repetition, and time-in-posture categories. Participants recorded time spent performing daily work tasks on a preprinted log, which was then used to calculate time-weighted-average exposures across each week of follow-up. In addition, a weekly Strain Index (SI) risk category was assigned to each participant. Incident musculoskeletal symptoms and disorders were assessed weekly. Proportional hazards analyses were used to examine associations between exposure measures and incident hand/arm and neck/shoulder symptoms and disorders. Results: Incident symptoms and disorders were common (incident hand/arm symptoms = 58/100 person-years (PY), incident hand/arm disorders = 19/100 PY, incident neck/shoulder symptoms = 54/100 PY, incident neck/shoulder disorders = 14/100 PY). Few associations between separate estimates of physical exposure and hand/arm and neck/shoulder outcomes were observed. However, associations were observed between dichotomized SI risk category and incident hand/arm symptoms (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.99, 3.04]) and disorders (HR = 1.93, 95% CI = [0.85, 4.40]). Conclusion: Evidence of associations between physical risk factors and musculoskeletal outcome was strongest when exposure was estimated with the SI, in comparison to other metrics of exposure. Application: The results of this study provide evidence that physical exposures in the workplace contribute to musculoskeletal disorder incidence. Musculoskeletal disorder prevention efforts should include mitigation of these occupational risk factors.

Source : Gerr, F., Fethke, N. B., Merlino, L. A., Anton, D., Rosecrance, J. C., Jones, M., Marcus, M., Meyers, A. R. (2013). A prospective study of musculoskeletal outcomes among manufacturing workers: I. Effects of physical risk factors. Human Factors. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720813491114

Prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques du membre supérieur chez le personnel administratif du centre hospitalier de Niort

Enquête de satisfaction prospective après la mise à disposition de repose-poignets clavier et souris
Une enquête de satisfaction prospective concernant l'utilisation de repose-poignets a été réalisée auprès de 135 personnes équipées. La satisfaction globale était de 59,3% pour pour le repose-poignets clavier et de 81,5% pour le repose-poignets souris.
Les repose-poignets pourraient donc être un moyen efficace de prévention primaire des TMS du membre supérieur et améliorer les conditions de travail.

Source : Martin-Aimon, E ; Nolin, S; Deplas, A; Decourt, J.P. Archives des maladies professionnelles et de l'environnement, 04/2013, p. 130-139. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.admp.2012.11.005

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