Psychosocial Working Conditions and Sickness Absence in a General Population

A Cohort Study of 21,834 Workers in Norway (The HUNT Study)
Objective: To examine the associations between psychosocial working conditions and sickness absence.
Methods: Data for 21,834 employed adults from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) were linked to the sickness benefit register and sickness absence during 1 year after survey participation was analyzed with logistic regression.
Results: A one unit change on a 0 to 3 self-reported job demand scale was associated with a fully adjusted 24% and 25% increased odds of sickness absence in men and women, respectively. A one unit change on a 0 to 3 scale for self-reported support at work was associated with a fully adjusted 13% and 17% reduced odds of sickness absence in men and women, respectively.
Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that demands, and to some extent support, at work might influence sickness absence—also when adjusting for a detailed categorization of occupations.

Source: Strømholm, Tonje; Pape, Kristine; Ose, Solveig Osborg; Krokstad, Steinar; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine: April 2015, Volume 57, Issue 4, p. 386-392.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000000362

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