Job characteristics and work organization factors associated with patient-handling injury among nursing personnel

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association of worker characteristics and work organization factors with prevalence of patient-handling injury among nursing personnel in an acute-care inpatient setting. Self-administered questionnaires (n = 585) captured worker characteristics and patient-handling injuries within the previous 6 months. Karasek's Job Content Questionnaire measured work organization factors, including job strain (high psychological demand, low decision latitude). We created a novel measure (job strain_{PHYSICAL}) reflecting high physical demand and low decision latitude, providing a more direct physiologic link to our outcome. Log-binomial regression was used to calculate prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Patient-handling injuries were prevalent (35%), and incident reports were filed infrequently for injuries receiving medical care. Prevalence of injury was higher among aides compared to nurses [adjusted PR 1.4, 95%CI (1.1–1.8)] as well as among those with high [adjusted PR 1.6, 95%CI (1.2–2.4)] or mid [adjusted PR 1.9, 95%CI (1.4–2.7)] levels of job dissatisfaction. The novel definition of job strain (job strain_{PHYSICAL}: high physical demand, low decision latitude) was more strongly associated with patient-handling injury than the traditional definition of job strain (high psychological demand, low decision latitude). These findings add to a growing body of literature on the highly contextual nature of work organization factors.

Source: http://iospress.metapress.com/content/g32t01tx16wu1gj2/

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