2014-10-01 12:00 - Messages

Performance study of protective clothing against hot water splashes

From bench scale test to instrumented manikin test 
Hot liquid hazards existing in work environments are shown to be a considerable risk for industrial workers. In this study, the predicted protection from fabric was assessed by a modified hot liquid splash tester. In these tests, conditions with and without an air spacer were applied. The protective performance of a garment exposed to hot water spray was investigated by a spray manikin evaluation system. Three-dimensional body scanning technique was used to characterize the air gap size between the protective clothing and the manikin skin. The relationship between bench scale test and manikin test was discussed and the regression model was established to predict the overall percentage of skin burn while wearing protective clothing. The results demonstrated strong correlations between bench scale test and manikin test. Based on these studies, the overall performance of protective clothing against hot water spray can be estimated on the basis of the results of the bench scale hot water splashes test and the information of air gap size entrapped in clothing. The findings provide effective guides for the design and material selection while developing high performance protective clothing.

Source: Lu Y, Song G, Wang F. Ann. Occup. Hyg. 2014.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annhyg/meu087

Ebola - Guidance on Personal Protective Equipment To Be Used by Healthcare Workers

The following procedures provide detailed guidance on the types of personal protective equipment (PPE) to be used and on the processes for donning and doffing (i.e., putting on and removing) PPE for all healthcare workers entering the room of a patient hospitalized with Ebola virus disease (Ebola). The guidance in this document reflects lessons learned from the recent experiences of U.S. hospitals caring for Ebola patients and emphasizes the importance of training, practice, competence, and observation of healthcare workers in correct donning and doffing of PPE selected by the facility.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/hcp/procedures-for-ppe.html

Health Care Workers’ Reported Discomfort While Wearing Filtering Face-Piece Respirators

Filtering face-piece respirators (FFRs) are one method of protecting health care workers from airborne particles; however, research suggests adherence is poor, perhaps due to worker discomfort. Three separate focus groups were conducted at two Veterans Affairs health care facilities. Seventeen health care workers who reported using FFRs as part of their job duties were in the focus groups. Focus group transcripts were coded using qualitative descriptive coding techniques. Participants described experiences of discomfort and physical mask features they believed contributed to discomfort. Participants believed FFRs influenced patient care because some patients felt uneasy and changed health care workers' behaviors (e.g., doffing procedures, loss of concentration, rushed patient care, and avoidance of patients in isolation resulting from FFR discomfort). Assessment of comfort and tolerability should occur during fit-testing. These factors should also be taken into account by management when training employees on the proper use of FFRs, as well as in future research to improve comfort and tolerability.

Source: Sara M. Locatelli; Sherri L. LaVela; Megan Gosch, Workplace Health Saf, 2014; 62 (9) :362–368.
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/21650799-20140804-03

NIOSH Study Finds Lack of Adherence to Safe Handling Guidelines for Administration of Antineoplastic Drugs

A new article from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found that recommended safe handling practices for workers who administer antineoplastic drugs in healthcare settings are not always followed. This study will be published in the November issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene and is currently available as an e-pub.
Results are derived from the 2011 Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers, the largest federally-sponsored survey of healthcare workers in the U.S. which addresses safety and health practices relative to use of hazardous chemicals. This paper presents findings on current administrative and engineering control practices, personal protective equipment (PPE), and barriers to using recommended PPE during administration of antineoplastic drugs by nearly 2,100 oncology nurses and other healthcare personnel who completed a module addressing antineoplastic drug administration.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/upd-9-26-14.html

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