2014-06-01 12:00 - Messages

Oregon OSHA Posts Respiratory Program Guide for Small Businesses

A new publication titled Breathe Right! from Oregon OSHA is an easily understood guide to developing a respiratory protection program for owners and managers of small businesses. It covers Assigned Protection Factors and different types of respiratory hazards, fit tests, seal checks, respirator cleaning and disinfection, voluntary use, employee training, and respirator use by bearded workers.

Source: http://ohsonline.com/articles/2014/06/26/oregon-osha-posts-respiratory-program-guide-for-small-businesses.aspx

Improving eye safety in citrus harvest crews through the acceptance of personal protective equipment, community-based participatory research, social marketing, and community health workers

For the last 10 years, the Partnership for Citrus Workers Health (PCWH) has been an evidence-based intervention program that promotes the adoption of protective eye safety equipment among Spanish-speaking farmworkers of Florida. At the root of this program is the systematic use of community-based preventive marketing (CBPM) and the training of community health workers (CHWs) among citrus harvester using popular education. CBPM is a model that combines the organizational system of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and the strategies of social marketing. This particular program relied on formative research data using a mixed-methods approach and a multilevel stakeholder analysis that allowed for rapid dissemination, effective increase of personal protective equipment (PPE) usage, and a subsequent impact on adoptive workers and companies. Focus groups, face-to-face interviews, surveys, participant observation, Greco-Latin square, and quasi-experimental tests were implemented. A 20-hour popular education training produced CHWs that translated results of the formative research to potential adopters and also provided first aid skills for eye injuries. Reduction of injuries is not limited to the use of safety glasses, but also to the adoption of timely intervention and regular eye hygiene. Limitations include adoption in only large companies, rapid decline of eye safety glasses without consistent intervention, technological limitations of glasses, and thorough cost-benefit analysis.

Source: Tovar-Aguilar JA, Monaghan PF, Bryant CA, Esposito A, Wade M, Ruiz O, McDermott RJ. J. Agromed. 2014; 19(2): 107-116.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1059924X.2014.884397

Fatal falls in the U.S. residential construction industry

BACKGROUND: Falls from heights remain the most common cause of workplace fatalities among residential construction workers in the United States.
METHODS: This paper examines patterns and trends of fall fatalities in U.S. residential construction between 2003 and 2010 by analyzing two large national datasets.
RESULTS: Almost half of the fatalities in residential construction were from falls. In the residential roofing industry, 80% of fatalities were from falls. In addition, about one-third of fatal falls in residential construction were among self-employed workers. Workers who were older than 55 years, were Hispanic foreign-born, or employed in small establishments (1-10 employees) also had higher proportions of fatal falls in residential construction compared to those in nonresidential construction.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that fall safety within the residential construction industry lags behind commercial construction and industrial settings. Fall prevention in residential construction should be enhanced to better protect construction workers in this sector.

Source: Dong XS, Wang X, Largay JA, Platner JW, Stafford E, Cain CT, Choi SD. Am. J. Ind. Med. 2014.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22341

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