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Alcohol and Drug Guidelines and Work Rule : Canadian Model for Providing a Safe Workplace
The Canadian Model for Providing a Safe Workplace (the Canadian Model) is a Best Practice Alcohol and Drug Policy that stakeholders in the Canadian construction, maintenance and oil and gas industries can adopt and follow. The purpose of the Canadian Model is to ensure a safe workplace for all workers by reducing the risks associated with the inappropriate use of alcohol and drugs. This sixth version, issued on July 1, 2018, is issued jointly by COAA and Energy Safety Canada. Source: https://www.coaa.ab.ca/library/canadian-model-version-6/
Differences in safety training among smaller and larger construction firms with non-native workers
Evidence of overlapping vulnerabilities Collaborative efforts between the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) led to a report focusing on overlapping occupational vulnerabilities, specifically small construction businesses employing young, non-native workers. Following the report, an online survey was conducted by ASSE with construction business representatives focusing on training experiences of non-native workers. Results were grouped by business size (50 or fewer employees or more than 50 employees). Smaller businesses...
Structural equation model of integrated safety intervention practices affecting the safety behaviour of workers in the construction industry
Fatality rates at workplaces in the construction industry are high compared to other industries. Tremendous effort is required to strive towards zero accidents. Managing foreign workers with different cultural backgrounds at the workplace requires appropriate safety intervention practices to improve workers' safety behaviour. Based on the literature, the importance of safety intervention for changing unsafe to safe worker behaviour is known. For this reason, an integrated safety intervention model affecting workers' safety behaviour was developed and tested. This study was conducted by...
Developing an inter-organizational safety climate instrument for the construction industry
In the construction industry, recent literature has promoted a design for safety approach that discusses the benefits of considering safety from the very start of the project lifecycle. With this approach, non-construction personnel, such as owners and designers, need to work alongside constructors and subcontractors to consider safety during design and procurement stages of a project. This is a difficult process, particularly with the degree of fragmentation in the industry. Safety climate survey instruments have been developed to identify these sources of fragmentation among stakeholder groups...
Methodology of improving occupational safety in the construction industry on the basis of the TWI program
The article presents the way of using the Training Within Industry (TWI) program, derived from manufacturing processes, in the construction industry in order to improve occupational safety. The origin and meaning of the TWI program and its relation to the philosophy of Lean Management is also described. The article shows how a preventative approach to ensuring safety has developed over the years. It has been proved that human errors, and not technical problems, have the greatest impact on the occurrence of accidents. After literature surveys, three main root causes of human errors were defined...
Occupational risk-prevention diagnosis: A study of construction SMEs in Spain
Occupational risk-prevention implementation and its integration in the management systems of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are studied in the Spanish Construction Sector, through a prospective analysis of data collected from a sample of 106 firms (SMEs) in the Autonomous Community of Castile-La Mancha (Spain). The selected sample is well suited to the economic reality of that Autonomous Community, considering the size of the population and the chosen confidence intervals and probabilities. The following data-collection techniques were used: surveys, open questions, closed questions, and dichotomous...
Improving safety climate through a communication and recognition program for construction
A mixed methods study We evaluated the efficacy of a novel safety communication and recognition program (B-SAFE), designed to encourage improvement of physical working conditions and hazard reduction in construction. Using mixed methods, we determined that B-SAFE led to many positive changes, including an improvement in safety climate, awareness, team-building, and communication. The study has important implications for both research and practice. Source: Sparer EH, Catalano PJ, Herrick RF, Dennerlein JT. Scand J Work Environ Health , 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3569
Promoting Healthy Workplaces by Building Cultures of Health and Applying Strategic Communications
Objective: The aim of the study was to identify key success elements of employer-sponsored health promotion (wellness) programs. Methods: We conducted an updated literature review, held discussions with subject matter experts, and visited nine companies with exemplary programs to examine current best and promising practices in workplace health promotion programs. Results: Best practices include establishing a culture of health and using strategic communications. Key elements that contribute to a culture of health are leadership commitment, social and physical environmental support, and employee...
Social identity in the construction industry
Implications for safety perception and behaviour The construction industry has one of the highest frequency levels and rates of work-related injuries, yet the evidence for successful attempts to reduce injuries is generally lacking. The motivational and (safety) behavioural implications of social identification and social categorization among construction labourer work crews were investigated to ascertain how their interactions are affected by the social structure and organization of work. Semi-structured group interviews and mini interviews during work were carried out with 13 concrete work crews...
Active behaviour change safety interventions in the construction industry
A systematic review The aims of this paper were to systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of active behaviour change safety interventions in the construction industry; and to determine the intervention characteristics most commonly associated with effectiveness in reducing injury rates and improving safety behaviour - intensity/frequency/duration, behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and theory-base. An electronic literature search (June 2014) was conducted to identify eligible interventions: those involving active involvement from workers/management in the construction industry;...
Best practices for health and safety technology transfer in construction
BACKGROUND: Construction continues to be a dangerous industry, yet solutions that would prevent injury and illness do exist. Prevention of injury and illness among construction workers requires dissemination, adoption, and implementation of these effective interventions, or "research to practice" (r2p). METHODS: CPWR recruited participants with experience and insight into effective methods for diffusion of health and safety technologies in this industry for a symposium with 3 group sessions and 3 breakout groups. The organizers reviewed session notes and identified 141 recommendations...
Development of a Health Risk Management Maturity Index (HeRMMIn) as a performance leading indicator within the construction industry
Safety cultural maturity reflects an organisation's degree of readiness to tackle safety risks. Until recently, no equivalent model for occupational health (OH) had been developed. The current research aimed to develop an OH management maturity index for the construction industry and use the index to survey OH management maturity in the industry. Index development entailed an initial evidence synthesis and subject expert consultation to establish the index's theoretical basis/scope. This identified the key constituents of OH maturity as: senior management commitment; continuous improvement;...
Development of a Health Risk Management Maturity Index (HeRMMIn) as a performance leading indicator within the construction industry
Safety cultural maturity reflects an organisation's degree of readiness to tackle safety risks. Until recently, no equivalent model for occupational health (OH) had been developed. The current research aimed to develop an OH management maturity index for the construction industry and use the index to survey OH management maturity in the industry. Index development entailed an initial evidence synthesis and subject expert consultation to establish the index's theoretical basis/scope. This identified the key constituents of OH maturity as: senior management commitment; continuous improvement;...
Understanding how to improve the management of exposure to wood dust amongst construction sub-contractors and manufacturing SMEs
Literature review Available evidence was reviewed to develop a better understanding of how to improve the management of wood dust exposure in small and medium-sized construction and manufacturing enterprises (SMEs). There was a paucity of research, with most papers exploring the factors that broadly influence health and safety (H&S) management in SMEs. Factors that influence SMEs' behaviours, included: i) limited resources (particularly for small construction and wood working companies), ii) a poor awareness of the importance of ill-health prevention, iii) risk control advice from third...
Safety, Health, and Well-Being of Municipal Utility and Construction Workers
Objective: To provide a baseline description of psychosocial workplace stressors and supports along with safety, injury, health, and well-being indicators in a sample of utility and construction workers for a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health–funded Total Worker Health™ intervention study. Methods: Survey responses and health assessments were collected from a total of 349 employees in two municipal utility departments. Results: Participants demonstrated poor weight control and body mass index and provided reports of frequent poor health habits, injury, and pain....
The effectiveness of a construction worksite prevention program on work ability, health, and sick leave
Objective This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a prevention program on work ability, health, and sick leave targeted at construction worksites. Methods A total of 15 departments (N=297 workers) from 6 construction companies participated in this cluster randomized controlled trial and were randomly allocated to the intervention (8 departments; N=171 workers) or control (7 departments; N=122 workers) group. The intervention consisted of two individual training sessions with a physical therapist aimed at lowering the physical workload, a rest-break tool to improve the balance between...
Determining safety inspection thresholds for employee incentives programs on construction sites
The goal of this project was to evaluate approaches of determining the numerical value of a safety inspection score that would activate a reward in an employee safety incentive program. Safety inspections are a reflection of the physical working conditions at a construction site and provide a safety score that can be used in incentive programs to reward workers. Yet it is unclear what level of safety should be used when implementing this kind of program. This study explored five ways of grouping safety inspection data collected during 19 months at Harvard University-owned construction projects...
Pre-conditioning for success: Characteristics and factors ensuring a safe build for the Olympic Park
This research has looked to identify factors which have contributed to the London 2012 Olympic Park being delivered on time, on budget and with an exemplary health and safety record. Where other research has captured 'how' things were done, this research has explored 'why' and focused on the underpinning human and organisational interactions. The research has tapped in to the close-out and lessons learnt activities for six of the venue and infrastructure projects. In addition interviews were conducted with executives from the Olympic Delivery Authority as client, their Delivery...
Visualizing safety assessment by integrating the use of game technology
Construction is undoubtedly the most dangerous industry in Hong Kong, being responsible for 76% of all fatal accidents in the region--around twenty times more than any other industry--and involving a loss of an estimated 145,000 man-days each year through accidents on site. In this paper, a new safety assessment method, termed the 4D Interactive Safety Assessment, is described which offers an improvement. This involves individual construction workers being presented with 4D virtual risky scenarios concerning their project and a range of possible actions for selection. The method provides an analysis...
Social marketing to plan a fall prevention program for Latino construction workers
BACKGROUND: Latino construction workers experience disparities in occupational death and injury rates. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration funded a fall prevention training program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in response to sharp increases in fall-related accidents from 2005 to 2007. The grant's purpose was to improve fall protection for construction workers, with a focus on Latinos. This study assessed the effectiveness of social marketing for increasing fall prevention behaviors. METHODS: A multi-disciplinary team used a social marketing approach to plan the program...
Innovative solutions to safety and health risks in the construction, healthcare and HORECA sectors
One conclusion from the EU-OSHA economic incentives project is that incentives schemes should not only reward past results of good OSH management (such as accident numbers in experience rating), but should also reward specific prevention efforts that aim to reduce future accidents and ill-health. Experts from the economic incentives project therefore suggested the development of compilations of innovative and evidence-based preventive solutions, starting with the three sectors construction, health care and HORECA (hotels, restaurants, catering). The preventive measures from these compilations are...
Leadership and worker involvement on the Olympic Park
The first report, Leadership and worker involvement on the Olympic Park, sets out how project leaders engaged with the supply chain to develop a more collaborative, challenging and learning culture. They created an environment where workers felt comfortable raising health and safety issues and could participate in solving problems. Source : http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr896.pdf
A commentary on routes to competence in the construction sector – RR877
The health and safety record of the UK construction sector is a prime focus of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), combining as it does high fatality and injury rates with relatively high rates of work-related ill-health. Persuasive proof of the link between competence and health and safety is difficult to demonstrate but, nevertheless, 'competence' has been central to improving the sector's health and safety performance since the late 1980s. The key questions of this research are whether current routes to competence - qualifications (both work-based and college-based), short courses...
Protecting Construction Worker Health and Safety in Ontario, Canada
Identifying a Union Safety Effect Objectives: Do Ontario unionized construction firms have lower workers' compensation claims rates compared with nonunion firms? Methods: Building trade and construction trade association lists of union contractors were linked to Workplace Safety and Insurance Board claims data for 2006 to 2012. Data were pooled for 2006 to 2012, and negative binomial regressions conducted with adjustment to estimate a union safety effect. esults: The sample included 5797 unionized and 38,626 nonunion construction firms. Total claims rates were 13% higher (1.13, 1.09 to 1.18...
Qualitative research amongst ‘hard to reach’ small construction site operators
Since 2000 there has been a significant reduction in fatal accidents and other injuries in the construction industry. This reduction has been attributed in part to the focus of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) on influencing large firms. In order to encourage the continuation of this downward trend, the HSE’s Small Sites Project was established to bring about the adoption of sensible risk management strategies to improve standards of health and safety on Small Sites. There is a specific focus on those sites with 5 or fewer employees on site. http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr719...
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