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Progressive Massive Fibrosis in Coal Miners From 3 Clinics in Virginia
Since 1970, the Coal Workers' Health Surveillance Program (CWHSP), administered by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, has offered periodic chest radiographs to working US coal miners.1 The primary purpose of the CWHSP is early detection of coal workers' pneumoconiosis to prevent progression to disabling lung disease, including progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). By the late 1990s, PMF was rarely identified among miners participating in the CWHSP. However, a 2014 report documented an increase in the prevalence of PMF in Appalachia.2 On February 1, 2017, the director...
Resurgence of Progressive Massive Fibrosis in Coal Miners - Eastern Kentucky, 2016
The prevalence of coal workers' pneumoconiosis fell precipitously after implementation of the Coal Mine Health and Safety Act and reached historic lows in the 1990s, with the most severe form, progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), nearly eradicated. Since that time, increases in the prevalence and severity of coal workers' pneumoconiosis have occurred, especially in central Appalachia. During January 1, 2015–August 17, 2016, a total of 60 patients identified through a single radiologist's practice had radiographic findings consistent with PMF; 49 had their radiograph taken during...
Debilitating Lung Disease Among Surface Coal Miners With No Underground Mining Tenure
Objective: To characterize exposure histories and respiratory disease among surface coal miners identified with progressive massive fibrosis from a 2010 to 2011 pneumoconiosis survey. Methods: Job history, tenure, and radiograph interpretations were verified. Previous radiographs were reviewed when available. Telephone follow-up sought additional work and medical history information. Results: Among eight miners who worked as drill operators or blasters for most of their tenure (median, 35.5 years), two reported poor dust control practices, working in visible dust clouds as recently as 2012. Chest...
Expression Levels of Surfactant-Associated Proteins and Inflammation Cytokines in Serum and Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Among Coal Miners
A Case-Control Study Objective: To investigate whether the Th1/Th2 balance and expressions of surfactant-associated proteins and cytokines in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) are associated with the development of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). Methods: A case-control study was conducted among 72 CWP cases and 68 controls. Th1 and Th2 populations were measured by flow cytometry. Expressions of surfactant-associated proteins A and D (SPA and SPD) and cytokines in serum and BALF were detected by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay. Data were analyzed by t test and logistic...
Safety line method for the prediction of deep coal-seam gas pressure and its application in coal mines
Gas pressure is an important index for evaluating the outburst risk and determining the gas content in coal seams. It is recommended to predict coal-seam gas pressure of the workface at deep levels before extending mining activities to deeper levels. According to the prediction results, measurements are taken for gas outburst prevention and control and for workload estimation. At present, regression methods are always used to process the numerous gas pressure data for prediction. Because there are many factors that influence the gas pressure which could lead to a deviation from actual values, the...
NSW Coal Mining
International Best Practice Measures to Prevent and/or Minimise Emissions of Particulate Matter from Coal Mining The objectives of the study were to: - Review international best practice measures to prevent and/or minimise particle emissions from all activities associated with NSW coal mines, including land rehabilitation. - Compare international best practice measures to prevent and/or minimise particle emissions with those currently used at NSW coal mines. - Make recommendations regarding the adoption of international best practice measures that could be practicably implemented in NSW at existing...
A review of information published since 1995 on coal mine dust exposures and associated health outcomes
In 1995 in a major NIOSH review and report of recommendations, entitled Criteria for a Recommended Standard – Occupational Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust. This Current Intelligence Bulletin updates the information on coal mine dust exposures and associated health effects from 1995 to the present. In part, the intent is to determine whether the 1995 recommendations, in this respect, remain valid, and to what extent, if any, modifications or additions are needed to those recommendations. The report does not deal with, nor discuss, issues of sampling and analytical feasibility nor technical...
Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis-Related Years of Potential Life Lost Before Age 65 Years
United States, 1968--2006 Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a preventable, slowly progressive parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation and deposition of coal mine dust in the lungs. The incidence and rate of CWP progression is related to the amount of respirable coal dust to which miners were exposed during their working lifetime (1). Early pneumoconiosis can be asymptomatic, but advanced disease often leads to disability and premature death (1,2). To characterize the impact of premature mortality attributed to CWP in the United States, CDC's National Institute for Occupational...
Coal's Assault on Human Health
Physicians for Social Responsibility has released a groundbreaking medical report, “Coal's Assault on Human Health,” which takes a new look at the devastating impacts of coal on the human body. Coal combustion releases mercury, particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and dozens of other substances known to be hazardous to human health. This report looks at the cumulative harm inflicted by those pollutants on three major body organ systems: the respiratory system, the cardiovascular system, and the nervous system. The report also considers coal's contribution to...
Black Lung Disease on the Rise
In September 2007, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) confirmed what doctors and occupational health specialists had been seeing when examining X-rays of coal miners’ lungs during the past several years. After years of decline, the rate of deadly disease had doubled and was appearing in younger and younger miners. http://blog.aflcio.org/2009/01/11/black-lung-disease-on-the-rise/

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