Occupation and Risk of Bladder Cancer in Nordic Countries

Objective: The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of bladder cancer incidence according to occupational categories in the Nordic countries.
Methods: The study cohort comprised 15 million individuals older than 30 years who participated in one or more population censuses in 1960, 1970, 1980/1981, and/or 1990. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated for 53 occupational categories.
Results: Significantly increased SIRs were observed among tobacco workers (1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24 to 1.96), chimney sweeps (1.48; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.80), waiters (1.43; 95% CI 1.33 to 1.53), hairdressers (1.28; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.40), seamen (1.22; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.30), printers (1.21; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.30), and plumbers (1.20; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.30). A significantly decreased risk of bladder cancer was observed among gardeners (0.78, 0.75 to 0.80), forestry workers (0.74; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.78), and farmers (0.70; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.71).
Conclusions: The SIR of bladder cancer was overall similar across the Nordic countries. The study suggests that occupation is evidently associated with bladder cancer risk.

Source: Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth; Sparen, Pär; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Pukkala, Eero. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine: August 2016, Volume 58, Issue 8, p. e301-e307.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000000803

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