Association Between Pulmonary Dysfunction as a Result of Occupational Exposures and Risk of Developing Cancer

Background: Cohen's hypothesis states that pulmonary dysfunction is the underlying unifying factor that leads to numerous health risks of inhaled toxicants.
Objective: To test the idea postulated by Cohen. Methods: We compiled a retrospective cohort (n = 8024) composed of participants in eight population-based research and occupational studies conducted between 1977 and 1989. Smoking history, occupational exposures, health indicators, and demographic information were obtained by questionnaire. Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry. Results: Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to test the Cohen's hypothesis. Risk of developing cancer increased (hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.67) if a subject had an obstructive pulmonary disease at baseline. Conclusion: Impaired lung function caused by environmental and occupational exposures is one of the risk factors for the incidence of cancer.

Source : Pahwa, Punam; Karunanayake, Chandima P.; Dosman, James A. Association Between Pulmonary Dysfunction as a Result of Occupational Exposures and Risk of Developing Cancer. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, December 2012, Vol. 54 - Issue 12, p.1471–1480. http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1097/JOM.0b013e3182623095
http://journals.lww.com/joem/Abstract/2012/12000/Association_Between_Pulmonary_Dysfunction_as_a.7.aspx

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