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Use of moulded hearing protectors by child care workers
An interventional pilot study Background: Employees of a multi-site institution for children and adolescents started to wear moulded hearing protectors (MHPs) during working hours, as they were suffering from a high level of noise exposure. It was agreed with the institutional physician and the German Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services (BGW) that this presented an opportunity to perform a scientific study to investigate potential beneficial effects on risk of burnout and subjective noise exposure at work when child care workers wear MHPs...
Situation au travail des personnes touchées par des acouphènes et/ou de l'hyperacousie
Cet article propose d'étudier les conditions de travail et l'impact du travail sur la santé d'une population mal connue, celle des personnes très gênées par des troubles de l'audition tels que des acouphènes ou de l'hyperacousie. Les données, issues du Baromètre Santé Sourds et Malentendants (BSSM) de l'Institut national de prévention et d'éducation pour la santé (INPES, devenu en 2016 Santé Publique France), fournissent des résultats sur la perception des conditions de travail...
Emotional stress may affect sound perception
A fresh article by researchers including Dan Hasson (picture) at Karolinska Institute and the Stress Research Institute in Stockholm, Sweden concludes that emotional exhaustion in women affects their sound perception in a negative way. The sample of subjects were taken from SLOSH (Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health) and followed up with additional data collection. After being provoked with an acute stress task women who had scored high on emotional exhaustion also showed a greater sensitivity to sounds. This study supports the theory that hearing problems such as hyperacusis (auditory...
Effects of hospital noise on staff: Increased stress, annoyance and burnout, but what about job performance?
Hospitals are often noisy and not conducive to staff performance. Indeed, many staff believe that noise negatively affects their professional performance, quality of work, and ability to concentrate and communicate. Research shows that increased stress and annoyance, increased rates of burnout, and reduced occupational health are a few of the possible effects of hospital noise on staff. However, only a few hospital studies have directly linked noise to job performance. Results show that noise and distractions can potentially deteriorate mental efficiency and short-term memory and increase errors...
Work-related noise may contribute to physical and mental health problems in teachers
Empirical research indicates that children and teachers are exposed to mean sound levels between 65 and 87 dB (A) and peak sound levels of 100 dB (A) in schools, which may lead to hearing loss and mental health problems. A questionnaire containing 13 targeted questions about noise and sensitivity to noise was distributed to 43 teachers aged between 25 and 64 years at five different primary schools in the Cologne municipal area. The small number of interrogated teachers leads to a wide range of deviation and little significance in the results. Thus, several results are reported following tendencies...
Hearing, sound fatigue and annoyance highly affected employees at the preschools.
Hearing impairments and tinnitus are being reported in an increasing extent from employees in the preschool. The investigation included 101 employees at 17 preschools in Umeå County, Sweden. Individual noise recordings and stationary recordings in dining rooms and play halls were conducted at two departments per preschool. The effects of noise exposures were carried out through audiometric screenings and by use of questionnaires. The average individual noise exposure was close to 71 dB (A), with individual differences but small differences between the preschools. The noise levels in the dining...
Mid-level transient sound occurrence rates significantly correlated to perceived annoyance and loudness levels
Intensive care units (ICUs) have important but challenging sound environments. Alarms and equipment generate high levels of noise and ICUs are typically designed with hard surfaces. A poor sound environment can add to stress and make auditory tasks more difficult for clinicians. Two units with similar patient acuity and treatment models showed little differences based on traditional overall noise measures. The objective differences between the two occupied sound environments emerged only through a more comprehensive analysis of the “occurrence rate” of peak and maximum levels, frequency...
An association between occupational noise exposure of low to moderate level and sickness absence is possible…
But to settle the question more high quality studies are needed. Noise in non-industrial workplaces is an increasing problem. Annoyance and complaints over noise are frequently reported in these workplaces, whereas the risk of hearing damage is usually not the major concern. Could it be a cause of increased sickness absence via a mechanism starting with job dissatisfaction or via health problems caused by the noise exposure? Only 3 epidemiological studies have investigated the effect of occupational noise on sickness absence. In the one study most pertinent to the question, noise was associated...
Surveys suggest that transport workers are more exposed to vibrations than the average working population.
European workers in transport over land and through pipelines seem also to be more exposed to vibrations from tools and machinery than the average working population. Several studies demonstrate the detrimental consequences of sustained sitting and being exposed to whole body vibration: exposure to vibrations may lead to back disorders. Based on the information available on heavy machines, the significance of the seat is important when steps to reduce full-body vibrations are taken. Full body vibration, for example caused by the driver’s cabin, may also affect the vision, coordination and...
En centre d’appel de multiples facteurs engendrent de la fatigue, des troubles de la voix, du sommeil et du caractère ainsi que du stress.
Une enquête épidémiologique a été conduite par l'INRS dans les centres d'appels téléphoniques (CT). Il s'agissait de mettre en évidence les caractéristiques organisationnelles qui ont des conséquences sur la santé. Quatorze facteurs organisationnels (FO) ont été identifiés comme étant les plus souvent associés aux contraintes. Ainsi, les conditions de travail sont souvent difficiles par la conjonction de multiples facteurs, entre autres, une ambiance sonore perturbatrice, l'utilisation...

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