2016-12-01 12:00 - Messages

Noise risk as described in instructions supplied with printing machinery

The printing industry uses a wide range of noisy machines that have the potential to damage workers' hearing if the risks are not effectively managed. Users need information that represents noise emissions during the intended uses of the machine, to enable an assessment and the management of the associated noise risks.
There is a legal requirement under the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008 for machinery manufacturers to provide declared noise emissions in instruction manuals. (This legislation implements the EU Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC). However, there is a lack of information on the adequacy of declared noise emissions for printing machinery sold in the United Kingdom.
This report describes research that was carried out to assess the adequacy of the noise emission information provided in a sample of fifteen instruction manuals supplied by manufacturers of printing machinery.

Source: http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrhtm/rr1086.htm

Les vibrations mains-bras

Plus d'un travailleur sur dix est régulièrement exposé aux vibrations transmises aux membres supérieurs. Celles-ci peuvent être responsables de lésions graves et irréversibles. Ces dernières années ont été marquées par la simplification de l'évaluation des risques et le développement de solutions de prévention.

Source: (2016) Travail et sécurité, (778)
http://www.travail-et-securite.fr/ts/dossier/.html

Use of moulded hearing protectors by child care workers

An interventional pilot study
Background: Employees of a multi-site institution for children and adolescents started to wear moulded hearing protectors (MHPs) during working hours, as they were suffering from a high level of noise exposure. It was agreed with the institutional physician and the German Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services (BGW) that this presented an opportunity to perform a scientific study to investigate potential beneficial effects on risk of burnout and subjective noise exposure at work when child care workers wear MHPs.
Methods: This was an intervention study which compared the initial values with those after a follow-up of 12 months. All teaching child care workers employed by the multi-site institution were offered the opportunity to take part. Forty-five (45) employees in 16 institutions participated. The subjects were provided with personally adapted MHPs and documented the periods of wear in a diary. At the start and end of the intervention, the subjects had to answer a questionnaire related to subjective noise exposure and burnout risk. In parallel, employees were surveyed who had not taken part in the intervention.
Results: Thirty-three (33) subjects took part in the follow-up after 12 months (follow-up rate 73 %). The median period of wear of MHPs was 34.6 h. During the period of observation, the mean subjective noise exposure increased by 2.7 %, and mean burnout risk by 2.5 scale points (baseline: 55.2, follow-up 57.7). Neither difference was statistically significant. 67 % of the participants reported that they were still capable of fulfilling their teaching duties when wearing the MHPs. In the reference group without the intervention, the increase in burnout risk was 3.9 points, which was even less favourable (baseline: 50.6, follow-up: 54.5).
Conclusions: Within the working environment of the child care workers, wearing MHPs did not reduce subjective noise exposure or burnout risk; the satisfaction of the study subjects with wearing MHPs decreased over time. There were however signs that the level of stress increased over time and that this might have been alleviated in the intervention group by wearing MHPs.

Source: Koch, P., Stranzinger, J., Kersten, J. F., & Nienhaus, A. (2016). Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 11(1), 50.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12995-016-0138-1

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